(Co)venture to the Roof?

Today, the Innovation Diploma Cohort had our weekly meeting to discuss about our (co)venture, originally called: “(co)venture to the roof.” A (co)venture is an engineering project that some people can work on in pairs or teams, concerning a topic on which the pairs or teams are more passionate about. The whole entire Disney Cohort has proposed the idea of working to build something on the roof. For the first week we really started assigning a specific day, Tuesday, to meet and discuss about our formed (co)venture. Then we split up into groups, based on who thought they were stronger interviewing or researching about the topic, then those teams talked about what their next steps were. I know that the interviewers decided on pairs, who were going to meet with different students and faculty and ask about, what I feel, related more to space in general.

The next week we met, the researchers were confused as to what exactly they were interviewing, whether it was roof-top gardens or spaces where students could work, so we decided to have a team meeting, where we discussed about where we are, and where we would like to go. I felt that we took a step back to see what we needed to do before we could continue on with the interviews by creating “How Might We…” statements, and by taking a look at what the real problem we are solving for is. I felt that I had an understanding of the cohort wanting to create something on the roof, and that we were skipping ahead to the conclusion, rather than looking at our problem we have, like a blind horse running at a Derby.

This week, we continued to meet up and we went over what we know, what we think we know, and what we need to find out. Mr. Adams also inserted his idea of “what if we interviewed other schools?” during the meeting, which is what I feel is what we focused on next. The cohort agreed on the idea of getting more students’ and teachers’ opinions, along with the opinions of other schools. We chose to create questions for either students, teachers, or other schools that could be used during an interview. Those questions were then divided up into three different sections, splitting the cohort into three separate groups. The groups then typed on a google document about how you could go more in depth with the questions, and what the protocol would be during the interview meetings. Once coming back together as a whole group, Mr. Adams brought about a very good point that maybe we haven’t researched enough.

A couple questions asked were: “What space are we designing in?”

“Have we found our problem we are solving?”πnya thought of the point that we had already found our problem: “Students need space.”

The thought of observation of how students use space was touched on again, with Mrs. Cureton hinting that maybe we need to go deeper into what we observe, and how we might have just scratched the surface. Mrs. Curetion also helped to show us how every member’s (i)ventures have a point where they connect to the idea of student led learning and experiences. Mr. Adams also talked about how we seem to have a hypothesis already made– students need a space to be in and call their own –yet we need to experiment with it, rather than waiting for a teacher to tell us what to do.

At the end of the meeting, I felt confusion on where we need to go next, and how we are going to get there. I also felt frustration because it might have felt that we have just been running in circles, unsure of where to really go next, going back to the idea that in “school” a teacher tells you everything to do, keeping a student away from the messy area of finding the problem, and already going ahead and giving you a problem to solve. In the real-world there are, as Mr. Adams and Mrs. Cureton said, “messy phases,” which I feel that we are in now. Is this really still a (co)venture to the roof? Or is this a (co)venture to new spaces, and student-led experiences and learning? Finishing our meeting, Jackson drew a beautiful chart called “The Life of A Project” by Austin Kleon, from the book Steal Like An Artist. This picture depicts the different emotional phases one goes through while doing a venture/project.

The Life of A Project

πnya believes that we are currently between the “This is gonna take some work,” and the “This sucks– and it’s boring” phase. Overall, I believe that even though this (co)venture will have many bumps along the way, this will be a big success for the Innovation Diploma Disney Cohort, and it will help us bond, along with teaching many important lessons about being an innovator.

3 thoughts on “(Co)venture to the Roof?

  1. Abigail I think that’s a great summary of what’s been going on with out coVenture, thank you for sharing. I would also like to add something about “The Life of a Project”. You may have not heard me at the very end since I was walking out of the room, but I think we are somewhere in between “This is going to take some work” and “This sucks– and it’s boring”. I plan on doing my own post later tonight about this idea of a “messy phase”, but in as a preview, I think this is becoming a little bit of a struggle for us because school has never exposed us to it, and that thought was really forming in my mind during this meeting.

    I also think the “The Life of a Project” is missing a few steps. It never talks about the break through “ah ha” moment. That period of time where you finally feel like you figured out something good that will work to solve your problem. That first little moment of success that drives others. Sure in the end your project probably won’t be as good as you may have once imagined, but that doesn’t make it awful. The way it is worded (and I know you didn’t make this image or anything) makes it sound like the project was a throw away that you suffered through and never enjoyed it, but you just had to get it done because you were told to. Such an important part of why we decide to even embark on a venture is because you are excited about it and care about the results and who it will impact.

    If there is no feeling of success and pride at the end of a project (venture), then you aren’t done yet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I definitely agree with you on the break through, and that it is an exceptionally important part to the phases of a project. I wonder if you might want to create your own “The Life of a Project,” from your perspective, and the different checkpoints. I think that a lot of cohort members are still very excited to be doing the (co)venture because a lot of us might want to really help with impacting those around us. This could also possibly allow us, students, to be able to really start to develop a voice at our school; Also, if I can recall, student voice is a (co)venture you and Emmy are focusing on.

      Like

  2. Reblogged this on The Life of Pinya and commented:

    My fellow cohort member, Abigail, wrote a great post about what’s been happing with the ID coVenture to the roof and this connects great to what I was planning on blogging about anyway tonight, so I’d really encourage reading it. And I’d also like to share my comment on it as well: Abigail I think that’s a great summary of what’s been going on with out coVenture, thank you for sharing. I would also like to add something about “The Life of a Project”. You may have not heard me at the very end since I was walking out of the room, but I think we are somewhere in between “This is going to take some work” and “This sucks– and it’s boring”. I plan on doing my own post later tonight about this idea of a “messy phase”, but in as a preview, I think this is becoming a little bit of a struggle for us because school has never exposed us to it, and that thought was really forming in my mind during this meeting.

    I also think the “The Life of a Project” is missing a few steps. It never talks about the break through “ah ha” moment. That period of time where you finally feel like you figured out something good that will work to solve your problem. That first little moment of success that drives others. Sure in the end your project probably won’t be as good as you may have once imagined, but that doesn’t make it awful. The way it is worded (and I know you didn’t make this image or anything) makes it sound like the project was a throw away that you suffered through and never enjoyed it, but you just had to get it done because you were told to. Such an important part of why we decide to even embark on a venture is because you are excited about it and care about the results and who it will impact.

    If there is no feeling of success and pride at the end of a project (venture), then you aren’t done yet.

    Like

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